Welcome Burdick Richmond

M, b. 9 November 1844, d. 20 January 1922

Welcome B. Richmond
Welcome B. Richmond
  • Occupation*: Retired salesman.1
  • Note*: Moved to Wisconsin when he was 10
    1883 moved to St. James MN
    Member of the Baptist Church

    Possibly born in 1843.
  • Birth*: Welcome Burdick Richmond was born on 9 November 1844 at NY, USA.2
  • Marriage*: He married Ida Matilda Spalding on 19 February 1871 at Coloma, Waushara County, WI, USA.2
  • Death*: Welcome Burdick Richmond died on 20 January 1922 at Windom, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG, at age 77; cause of death: Scuile ?au???? following thrombosis of ????ll of left C// also complete paralysis 2 days before death. Contributory: old age.1
  • Burial*: He was buried on 22 January 1922 at Windom, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG.2,3
    Welcome Richmond gravestone, Lakeview Cemetery
  • ObituaryText: News reached Windom last Friday of the passing of a former well-known citizen of Windom, W.B. Richmond, whose death occurred at the home of his son, Dr. Richmond, where the deceased, with Mrs. Richmond, had been making his home for some time. During Mr. Richmond's residence in Windom he made many friends who knew him for his sterling character and friend ways. The funeral services were held at Jeffers Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock and the remains brought to Windom for burial. Welcome Burdick Richmond was born in the state of New York, Nov. 9, 1844, moving with his parents to Wisconsin when he was about ten years of age. He was one of a family of 10 children, only two of whom survive him. E.D. Richmond of Proberta, Cal, and Mrs. George Green of Mora, Minn. On Feb. 19, 1871 he was united in marriage to Ida M. Spalding at Coloma, Wis. They came that spring to Minnesota where they settled on a claim in Martin County and endured hardships of pioneer life. Three children were born to them: Edith A., now Mrs. R E Webb, at Lakeland, Florida; C.D. Richmond of Jeffers, Minn.' and Eddie J., who died in infacny. In 1883 they moved to St. James where they both became members of the Baptist church. They have lived in Windom since 1896, except since March 1920, when they moved to Jeffers to be with their son. Mr. Richmond's health was good for one of his age until November when he was stricken with thrombasis of the blood vessels and obliged to take to his bed. All that medical skill and loving care could accomplish was unavailing and he passed away Jan. 20, 1922, survived by his wife, two children, and one grand-child, besides the brother and sister already mentioned. Deceased who was well known throughout the county, was a man of upright christian character, a kind and loving husband and father, a good neighbor and friend. He will be greatly missed by those who knew him best. Besides being a member of the Windom Baptist Church, he also belonged to the Odd Fellows Lodge and the Royal Arcanum. on 25 January 1922.2

Family: Ida Matilda Spalding b. 7 Dec 1850, d. 20 Aug 1926

Citations

  1. [S209] Welcome Burdick Richmond, Certificate of Death.
  2. [S208] Cottonwood County Citizen, 25 Jan, 1922, p. 1.
  3. [S474] See memorial number unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address, http://www.findagrave.com, Memorial #128560980.

Susanna Barden

F

Family: Christopher Richmond b. 1687/88

John Rogers

M
  • Birth*: John Rogers was born at Duxbury.
  • Note*: Came on mayflower.
  • Marriage*: He married Hannah (?)

Family: Hannah (?)

Hannah (?)

F

Family: John Rogers

Judith Richmond

F, b. 29 May 1717
  • Birth*: Judith Richmond was born on 29 May 1717.

Elizabeth Richmond

F, b. 1 October 1719
  • Birth*: Elizabeth Richmond was born on 1 October 1719.

Ida Matilda Spalding

F, b. 7 December 1850, d. 20 August 1926

Ida Spalding
Ida Spalding
  • Birth*: Ida Matilda Spalding was born on 7 December 1850 at Milford, Hillsborough County, NH, USAG.1,2
  • Marriage*: She married Welcome Burdick Richmond on 19 February 1871 at Coloma, Waushara County, WI, USA.3
  • Death*: Ida Matilda Spalding died on 20 August 1926 at Jeffers, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG, at age 75.4,2
  • CauseDeath: Noted as septicemia (infection at base of spine) cause unknown (3 da.)2
  • ObituaryText: Mrs. Richmond dead. Was formerly a resident of this city.
    Mrs. W. B. Richmond of Jeffers, a former resident of this city died at the home of her son, C.D. Richmond at Jeffers on Saturday, Aug. 21, 1926.
    Ida Mathilda Spalding was born on December 4th, 1850 in Milford, New Hampshire and died on August 21, 1926 at the age of 76 years, 8 months and 17 days.
    When a child, she moved with her parents to Wisconsin where she lived until 1871, when she was united in marriage to Welcome B. Richmond. Three children blessed this union, Edith A. Webb of Lakeland, Florida, and Chas. D. Richmond of Jeffers, who survive her. She has also one grandchild, Ida Mary Richmond, a sister, Mrs. John Smith and a brother, James N. Spalding, who reside at Coloma, Wisconsin. Mr. Richmond died on Jan. 20, 1922.
    Since the spring of 1871 she has lived in Minnesota, first on a farm in Martin County, later at St. James and Windom and since 1919 made her home with her son, Charles Richmond. She was a member of the Baptist church and her life was that of a Christian, always patient in her sufferings, ever ready with a cheerful word for all and especially so for children whom she dearly loved. Her mind was unusually bright for one of her age and remained so until shortly before her death, which came apparently without pain.
    Funeral services were hled on Tuesday afternoon at the home, and were conducted by Rev. Stoughton of Windom, assisted by Rev. Potthoff and Rev. G. L. morgan. Interment was made in the Windom cemetery where her husband was buried. Those from away who attended the funeral were relatives, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Webb of Lakeland Fla, Jas. N Spalding of Coloma, Wis and the old family friends from Monterey, Mrs. J E Steele, Mr. L. Steele, Mrs. F. Christman and Mrs. Meghan.1
  • Burial: She was buried on 24 August 1926 at Windom, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG; Volunteer FAG member searched the stated plot or section and could not find the grave. They also reported, specifically: The sexton has confirmed that she is in section N-51. I have walked that area several times and cannot find a marker.2,5
    Ida Richmond gravestone, Lakeview Cemetery
  • Probate*: Her estate was probated on 1 April 1927; Personal property of the value of $1,362.40 cash, no real estate, parcels of land in County of Cottonwood, Lots three and ten in Block Nine in the village of Jeffers. Sole heirs are Edith Webb, daughter and Charles D. Richmond, son. To Edith Webb and Charles D. Richmond, said children of the said decedent, each an undivided 1/2 interest and estate thereof, in and to Lots 3 and 10, Block 9 in the Village of Jeffers. Also so the said Edith Webb and Charles D. Richmon, each the sum of $681.20 in cash.4

Family: Welcome Burdick Richmond b. 9 Nov 1844, d. 20 Jan 1922

Citations

  1. [S344] Unknown.
  2. [S356] Ida Richmond, Certificate of Death.
  3. [S208] Cottonwood County Citizen, 25 Jan, 1922, p. 1.
  4. [S78] Final decree of distribution 2107.
  5. [S474] See memorial number unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address, http://www.findagrave.com, Memorial # 128561022.

Mary Richmond

F, b. 18 October 1721
  • Birth*: Mary Richmond was born on 18 October 1721.

Eliakim Richmond

M, b. 28 January 1724/25
  • Marriage*: Eliakim Richmond married Sarah Hackett.
  • Birth*: Eliakim Richmond was born on 28 January 1724/25.

Family: Sarah Hackett b. 19 May 1725

Phebe Richmond

F, b. 2 January 1727/28
  • Birth*: Phebe Richmond was born on 2 January 1727/28.

Joseph Richmond

M, b. 4 February 1730/31
  • Birth*: Joseph Richmond was born on 4 February 1730/31.

Joseph Williams

M

Family: Elizabeth Watson

Elizabeth Watson

F

Family: Joseph Williams

David Andrew Noble1,2

M, b. 17 December 1844, d. 29 December 1935

D A Noble
  • Association*: David Andrew Noble was associated; president of Old Settlers Association of Cottonwood Co.3
  • Fact 1*: He wasan only child; Was an only child.4
  • Note*: P. 22 had a livery in Jeffers
    V. 2
    A well-known retired farmer of Windom. an honored veteran of the Civil War and one of the most substantial citizens of Cottonwood County, native of Canada.
    Born Dec. 17, 1843 only child of Robert and Mary Collins Noble. Was about 11
    when he went to Wisconsin with his widowed mother and grew to manhood in LaCrosse County, completing his schooling in the public schools of that county. Dec. 17, 1861 enlisted in Company B, Second Wisconsin Calvary.Discharged Dec. 15, 1865 at Madison WI. 1874 he came to Cottonwood CO MN. Homesteaded a quarter section in Amo township and took a timber claim on the quarter section adjacent. 1879 married. Lived in a sod house for the first year and presently built a more substantial home, and it was not long until their affairs began to prosper. When they started housekeeping they had neither chairs nor a table; boxes serving in lieu thereof. Mr. Noble took a proper part in the civic affairs of his home township and for years was active in Republican politics, serving for some time as assessor of Amo township. During his residence in Windom he also served as a member of the council. About 1895 he retired from active labors of the farm and moved into Windom, long having been one of the best-known men in that city. For nearly 15 years was a superintendent of part
    of the stock exhibit at the fair. march 12, 1879 married Mary Cuthbert born
    Carseburn Scotland, daughter of Alexander and Elizabeth Ogg Cuthbert, who came to this county with their family in 1871 and located in LaCrosse County WI later moving to Buena Vista county Iowa where they spent their last days.
    has 6 children: Myrtle Eliza, Iva Mary, Jessie Isabel, a graduate of the Winona
    Normal School, Geneve Ida, Bertha Vera also a graduate of Winona Normal School.
    and David Alexander graduated from Ames College with the class of 1916. Nobles are members of the Presbyterian church and take a warm interest in all movements having to do with the advancement of the best interests of the community at large. Mr. Noble and GB Rice during the early settlement in order to get trees for their groves, went to Mankato, Kasota, and St. Peter and
    pulled the small trees to plant in their tree claim as they didn't have enough
    money to buy trees.5
    Back: Jessie, Myrtie, Iva. Front: Bertha, Grandma Noble, Joe (David Alexander) Grandpa Noble, Geneva
  • Birth*: He was born on 17 December 1844 at Kingston, Ontario, Canada.6,7
  • Religion*: He was listed as W Methodist in the census.
    Both helped establish the
    Amo community church.8,4
  • Census*: He appeared on the census of 1851 at Wolford Twp, Grenville, Ontario, Canada; listed as age 8.9
  • Residence*: He lived circa 1855 at LaCrosse County, WI, USA; Settled in LaCrosse County WI (near West Salem) when he was 11.4
  • Milit-Beg*: He began military service on 17 December 1861 at LaCrosse County, WI, USA.4,5
  • MilitaryService*: When he was 18 he enlisted in Company B, 2nd WI Cavalry. He served 4 years-Discharged Dec 15, 1865. Served in the western army under Grant, Sherman, and for a short time, Custer. He was an orderly for General Sherman.

    His friend and neighbor, John A. Brown enlisted with him. Mustered out at
    Austin Texas. At the time of his death he was last surviving Civil War Veteran
    in Cottonwood Co. from 1862 to 1865.4,10
    D A Nobel, taken after the fall of Vicksburg
  • Milit-End*: He ended military service on 15 December 1865.4
  • Occupation*: David, age 25 who was a farmer. Worked in at a lumber company after discharged in 1865. in 1870.11,4
  • Residence: He lived in 1874 at Amo Twp, Cottonwood County, MN, USA; In 1874 he went to
    Cottonwood Co, MN and filed a homestead in Section 6 Amo Township. He built a
    sod house.4
  • Marriage*: He married Mary Ann Cuthbert on 12 March 1879 at Burns Valley, LaCrosse County, WI, USA; 1879 he married Mary Cuthbert, a native of scotland. They were
    married at the home of her parents in Burns Valley.4,12
    David Noble and MaryAnn Cuthbert wedding, 1879
  • Association: David Andrew Noble was associated in 1882; was superintendent for cattle for the agricultural Society (fair
    assoc.) 1882.13
  • Residence: He lived in 1890 at Windom, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG; After moving to Windom MN in 1890's David purchased a 27
    acre tract west of the fair grounds and built a nice home there.4
  • MilitaryService: . On this 14th day of October 1926,
    personally appeared before me within and for the county and State aforesaid,
    David A. Noble, who being duly sworn according to law, declares that he is 81
    years of age, and a resident of Windom, county of Cottonwood, State of
    Minnesota; and that he is the identical person who was enrolled at LaCrosse,
    Wisconsin, under the name of David A. Noble, on the 17th day of December, 1861
    as a private, in Co. B 2nd Wisconsin Vol. Cav., in the service of the United
    States, in the civil war and was honorably discharged at Madison, Wisconsin on
    the 15th day of November 1865. That his personal description at enlistment was
    as follows: Height 5 feet 7 inches; complexion light; color of eyes grey; color
    of hair light; that his occupation was farmer; that he was born Dec. 17th 1844
    at Canada West, Canada. That his several places of residence since leaving the
    service have been has follows: LaCrosse, Co Wisconsin until 1875, Cottonwood
    County, Minnesota until the present date. That he is a pensioner under
    Certificate No. 382956. (Sworn before the Deputy County Auditor, 14th Oct.
    1926)
    FROM: DECLARATION FOR INVALID PENSION
    State of Minnesota, county of Cottonwood. On this 21st day of March, 1891,
    personally appeared before me a David A. Noble in and for the county and Sate
    aforesaid David A. Noble, aged 47 ears, who being duly sworn according to law,
    declares that he is the identical person who was enrolled under that name on or
    about the 17th of Dec 1861 in company B, 2 Regiment, Wisconsin cavalry Vols. in
    the War of the rebellion and served at least ninety days and was honorably
    discharged at Madison Wisconsin on or about the 15th of Dec. 1865. That he is
    now in part unable to earn a support by manual labor by reason of inflammatory
    (?) and its results Malarial poisoning and results of intermittant fever. That
    said disabilities are not due to his vicious habits and are to the best of his
    knowledge and belief permanent that he was a pensioner under certificate no.
    382956 at $200 per month for malarial poisoning. that he makes this declaration
    for the purpose of being placed on the pension roll of the United States, under
    the provisions of the act of June 27, 1890. He hereby appoints Louis K. Gillson
    & Co of Chicago IL his true and lawful attorneys to prosecute his claim and
    agrees to pay his said attorneys a fee of ten dollars for prosecuting this
    claim.

    FROM: Claimant's Affidavit
    State of Minnesota, county of Cottonwood in the matter of origianl invalid
    pension claim no. of David A. Noble, B2 Wis. Cav. Cols. personally came before
    me..David A. Noble, the claimant well known to be to be reputable and entitled
    to credit and who being duly sworn, declares in relation to his claim for
    pension as follows: I am 38 years of age, I reside in Amo county, and State
    aforsaid, and my post office address is Odell, Cottonwood County, Minneosta.
    Three years immediately preceding my enlistment in the service of the United
    States on the 17th of December 1861 I resided in the following named places:
    Burns Lacrosse Wisconsin. My occupation was that of a farmer. My discharge from
    said service was on the 15th day of november 1865. I have resided Burns
    LaCrosse Wis. for 9 years from that date till present in town of Amo,
    Cottonwood, Minnesota and my occupation has been that of a farmer. I further
    state that the disability for which I claim a pension arises from intermittant
    fever which was contracted as heretofore stated in my declaration now on file.
    From my said discharge to the present time, I have received the following
    medical treatment for said disease. Dr. Palmer of Sparta Wisconsin in the in
    winter of 1866. Dr Palmer is now dead. Dr. Stankland of Bangor Wisconsin sold
    me medicine at different times as long as I was in Wisconsin. Dr. Brown of West
    Salem Wis. sold me medicine in the winter and spring of 1868. A Dr. in Encla
    sold me medicine in the spring of 1870. Dr. Green Windom Minnesota in the
    summer of 1878 and several other time ? bought ? medicine a great many times.
    During the period las mentioned I have suffered the following acute disease:
    most all the time a ? in my left side, and in lower part of breast considerable
    pains and stiffness. And shoulds pain in head and back, when I work hard and a?
    or ? when I catch cold. And during all of the said time, my physical condition
    and ability to perform manual labor has been as follows: the first 3 or 4
    months after dischare I had to ? my bed most of the time. I could ???? balance
    of the year. Did not earn my board for 1 1/2 year since I have worked most of
    the time a little, some for a few days and weaks feeling good and as much of
    the time feeling bad. Some days can do nothing in the harvests of
    1879,1880,1881 was ladi up most all the time and all through each stacking
    season of the above mentioned years some times for weakes I can do a man's work
    every day but in the summer am most subject to fevers and stiffness. I further
    say nothing. David A Noble.

    FROM: General Affidavit for any purpose
    State of Minnesota, county of Cottonwood. In the matter of pension claim
    account of David A. Noble of Co. B 2nd Wis Cav, On this ninth day of April 1915
    personally appeared before me David . Noble, a resident of Windom, county of
    Cottonwood State of Minnesota, whose PO address is Windom, Min. a respectable
    citizen and entitle to credit who, being duly sworn, says that he is 71 years
    of age; that he has an interest in said claim and makes the following
    statement: 1850 I lived near Merick Will on the Rideau River or at Kingston
    think Merickwill Kittley County Canada. The township of Wolford this is as near
    as I can remember. No brothers or sisters. My fathers name was Robert Noble. I
    think has was alive then. Mothers name was mary Ann Noble. In 1860 I lived in
    Burns township LaCrosse County Wis. Mother was alive there. Worked for and I
    lived with Ira Hulbert of Burns township LaCrosse County Wis.

    FROM: General Affidavit
    State of Wisconsin, County of LaCrosse. In the matter of the claim for invalid
    pension, No. 434310 of David A. Noble B2 Wis Ca. personally came before me, a
    notary public in and for the county and state aforesaid, Richard Allimas ? and
    Ira Hulbert. PO address Banfor LaCrosse Wis person of lawful age, who, being
    duly sworn declare in relation to the aforesaid slaim as follows: each for
    himself- I was acquainted with the said David A. Noble before he enlisted in
    the service of the United States and also after his discharge. Before he
    enlisted he was well and hearty and able to do a good days work at all times.
    After his return from the army, I knew him well until he went to Minnesota in
    the year 1874 and during all that time he was in poor health. He was afflicted
    with chills and fever. and could not work a part of the time. And the said Ina
    Hulbert further said an oath for himself that this said David A. Noble worked
    for him before and after his enlisment, that before he enlisted said D. A.
    Noble was tough and rugged and able to work as well as any ? man of his age.
    And that after his return from the service said David A. Noble worked for said
    Hulbert and was in such poor health that he could not do any work only a poart
    of the time. That he worked for him the first harvest after his return and that
    he only worked about three days during the harvest which lasted two or three
    weeks. They further declard that they have no interest in said claim and are
    not any concerned in its prosecution.

    FROM: Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions. Washington DC Oct. 27,
    1899 Sir. Will you kindly answer, at your earliest convenience, the questions
    enumerated below? The information is requested for future use and it may of
    great value to your family.
    No. 1 Are you a married man? If so, please state your wife's full name and her
    maiden name. Yes, Mary A. Noble Mary A. Cuthbert
    No. 2 When, where and by whom were you married. March 12th 1879 at Burns
    LaCrosse Co Wis. By Rev. J. C. Caldwell of West Salem.
    No. 3. What record of marriage exists? It was put on record at LaCrosse Wis.
    but our certificate is lost but can give play of witness
    No. 4 Were you previously married? No
    No. 5 Have you any children living? Yes, Mertie E. Oct. 26 th 1880, Iva M. Born
    March 21st 1882, jessie B. Brn Dec. 25th 1883, Geneva I Born Dec 7th 1885,
    Bertha V. Born Dec. 30, 1890. David A. Born Sep. 4th 1893
    Date of reply December 11th 1899, David A. Noble.

    FROM: Department of the Interior, Bureau of Pensions
    ... Record of marriage? perhaps at Presbyterian church, West Salem Wis.
    ...children? Eliza M. Noble, born Oct. 26, 1880, Iva M. Noble, born March 21,
    1882, Jessie I Noble born 1883 Dec 25. Geneva I Noble, born Dec 7 1885, Bertha
    v. Noble born 1890 Dec 3, David A. Noble born Sep 4 1893

    Date: March 20, 1915

    FROM: Soldiers Application for ? & addrt. Pension, Cert. No 382956
    State of Minnesota, county of Cottonwood. On this 6th day of March 1891
    personally appeared David A. Noble aged 47 years ...This claim is made for
    purpose of obtaining pension on account of inflammatory rheumatism and results
    incurred at same time and place as intermittent fever, for results of which
    pension was allowed by cert. no 382956 on which he also claims restoration.
    Disabilities were all alleged in original application.

    FROM: Ajuntant General's Office, Washington Jan. 30, 1883
    Respectfully returned to the commisioner of pensions. David A. Noble, a private
    of Company B 2nd Regiment Wisconsin Cavalry Volunteers was enrolled on the 17th
    day of December 1861 3 yrs at LaCrosse Wisconsin and is reported: on roll March
    and April 1862 (first on file) present, same report to June 30th 1863. July &
    Aug 1863 absent on detached service since Aug. 20th 1863 with scouting party to
    Lawrence. Sept & Oct/63 present. same report to Dec. 31/63. Reinlisted V? Vol.
    Dec 31 1863. Jan, Feb, Mar, and April 1864 (4 mon) absent on ? furlough since
    March 20/1964. Nay and June 1864 presen. Not ? absent of return May/64. Same
    report to Oct 31/64. Nov & Dec 1864 absent on expedition. Jan Feb 1865 present
    same report to Oct 31 1865. Mustered our, a Sergeant with Company at Austin
    Texas Nov 15th 1865. The records of this office do not show Int fever alleged.
    Regt? hospital records covering from Dec. /61 to Dec/65 show him admitted to
    Reg. Hospital Oct 7/65 with Gastritis. Oct 14/65 to duty. Company ? rpts ? to
    April/65 not on file on 14 December 1926 at Cottonwood County, MN, USA.14
  • Marriage Fact*: Written by Jessie Nobel for their 50th Anniversary celebration.

    On a lonely stretch of prairie
    Stood a shanty made of sod,
    Looking eastward, looking westward,
    O'er the trails the buffalo trod.

    In the spring of seventy-nine
    Ona sunndy day in March
    When the snow had long since melted,
    Blue beneath the azure arch.

    In a wagon drawn by horses
    came the sturdy pioneer
    To bettle with the elements
    And homestead his claim that year.

    Came David, dark of hair and beard
    Returning from his sojourns
    With his bride, the gentle Mary,
    From the valley known as Burns.

    Far from books and daily papers
    Still unknown the rural route
    Happy as this generation,
    Happier I have no doubt.

    So they plowed, dragged and seeded
    Hoping for a bountious crop
    But allin vain man's efforts
    Only toil was left on top.

    Three years the same thing happened
    Little reason to rejoice.
    Folks called them fools for staying
    they had no other choice.

    Days of terrific blizzards
    With mercuty at 40 below
    When they burned hay in the cook stove
    And sugar and flour ran low.

    Crusts form on top of the snow,
    too thin for the weight of a horse.
    They had to have needed supplies,
    Some sugar and tea, of course.

    So taking his little land sled,
    throwing on an old gunny sack
    My father walked 16 miles
    to the town of Windom and back.

    He planted a fin grove of trees
    to break the force of the storm
    This served as a beautiful landmard
    to guide travelers forlorn.

    To the south were splendid neighbors
    Ebenezer and Ida Rice
    And likewise to the eastward
    M N Cadwell and his wife.

    there were Vet and Amy Collins,
    Bordy and Ida allan Rice
    On the west still live the Tabberts
    Decendents of a German race.

    then there were the Sillimans,
    Will and Rene, Oney and Jen
    Fred and Roy, some of the former are now Ford Garage men.

    Feeling a lack of consolation,
    they decided to build a church
    Some paid cash, while others worked.
    It still stands "Old Amo Church"

    Still a longing for the flowers
    Mother found scarce on the prairie line
    She named her first three children Myrtle, Ive an Jassamine.

    Next Geneva, later Bertha
    Lastly little David Joe
    Not one of us are missing
    All respond with a glad "hello".

    From far and near we're gathered,
    Jeffers, Sioux City and St Paul
    To celebrate your golden wedding
    The happiest day of all.

    May the cold blasts of winter
    the aches and pains of mortal strife
    Pass o'er you, oh so lightly
    In your sunset days of life.
    in 1929.15
  • CauseDeath: Noted as Primary underlying cause of death was LOBAR PNEUMONIA, duration 9 days.
    Contributory causes of importance: Arteriosclerosis 20 years, chronic
    interstitial nephritis 15 years.16
  • Death*: He died on 29 December 1935 at Windom, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG, at age 91; Lubar pneumonia, 9 days. Contributory: artheriosclerosis, 20 yrs. chronic interstitial nephritis, 15 yrs.16
  • ObituaryText: Last member Windom G.A.R. mustered out...was love and esteemed by thousands
    It is with sadness, not unmixed with selfishness, that we announce the passing of D.A. Noble, the last of the ranks of the pioneer members of the G.A.R. in Windom. Sadness at the thought of the loss to this community and the passing of a familiar figure that represented an era in the history of this county. Yet we feel that it would be selfishness for us to plead for a continuance of his acquaintance and friendship, realizing that this would mean continuance of growing infirmities from which there could be no other permament relief.
    Only a few days ago, he celebrated his 91st birthday with his loving children all about him and many neighbors calling to wish him happiness. About a week ago he caught the prevailing cold and later suffered an attack of pleurisy from which he was unable to recover and the death's angel called him early last Sunday morning.
    The passing of our dear old friend, D.A. Noble, the last member of that once strong and worthy organization of the G.A.R., the LaGrange Post of Windom, reminds us of the sad passing of the last member of a "last man's club". For a great many years we have marked the thinning ranks of this organization as they gathered on Memorial Day and on other occasions and have realized that sooner or later this day must come--the day when we laid away the last one of these noble heroes of the nation. We have realized that sooner or later the last chair at these gatherins would be vacant.
    From a personal acquaintance of a great many years, we mourn with the closest of relatives the passing of this dear neighbor and friend. But like everyone who knew him, we count ourselves lucky to have enjoyed his friendship and sweet companionship for so many years. We have had him share with us griefs and worries and have seen him carry his burdens with a courage that was an inspiration to all of us. As a neighbor, he has share[sic] the midnight watch with us in the house of sorrow and know that no neighbor ever went to him with their trouble with out coming away feeling that he had taken some of the load on his own shoulders.
    Energetic all of his long life, thrifty and frugel, no one ever saw him in court with an action against a neighbor. Suffering financial losses with the rest of us, no one ever heard him say aught against a neighbor or ever heard an employee complain of a hard master. The life of this saintly man among us is one giving evidence that this sort of human relationship with our fellows is not impossible, but is one that we should all try to emulate.
    Mr. Noble was born in Ontario, Canada, December 17, 1844 and was the only son of Robert and Mary (Collins) Noble. Mr. Noble's father died in Canada, when David was a small child.
    The widow and her son David came to the United States in 1855 and settled in LaCrosse County, Wisconsin, near West Salem. On December 17, 1861 he joined Co. B, 2nd Wisconsin Volunteer calvary and served throughout the Civil War in the Southland.
    His regiment took part in the siege of Vicksburg and numerous other engagements in Mississippi, Arkansas and Texas. He served under General U.S. Grant, General W. T. Sherman, General Geo. H. Custer and others. At one time he was a personal aid to General Sherman. After the Civil War he returned to LaCrosse County, Wis. For several years he worked for lumber companies in the central and northern Wisconsin.
    In 1874 he came to Cottonwood county, and took a homestaed in Amo township, now situated about one mile south of Storden. He endured the privations of a pioneer and took great interest in starting a large grove. Gathering seedlings and young trees over a wide area he succeeded in developing a fine grove and wind break of about ten acres. Some of the trees were procured at and near Mankato, where he and seom of the neighbors drove with teams and wagons, a distance of about 80 miles. This homestead he still owned at the time of his death.
    On March 12, 1879, Mr. Noble was married to Mary Cuthbert, also of LaCrosse County, Wisconsin. Mrs. Noble was a native of Carseburn, Scotland and came to this country with her parents in 1871.
    To Mr. and Mrs. Noble six children were born, all of whom are living as follows: Mrs. C.D. Richmond of Jeffers; Mrs. T.F. Lewis of St. Paul, Jessie Noble of Windom; Mrs. S.A. Brown of Windom; Mrs. Gilbert Edwards; and David A. Noble both residing at Sioux City Iowa. Mary A. Noble, the deceased's wife preceded him in death April 15, 1931. Both Mr. and Mrs. Noble were members of the Presbyterian church of this city.
    Mr. Noble was a charter member of LaGrange Post No 79, G.A.R. and served as district commander of the SW Minn. G.A.R. association in 1934 and until the summer of 1935. Six children, 12 grandchildren and 6 great grandchildren survive.
    All the children were called home and helped with loving care for the few days he was ill and remained for the funeral.
    A very impressive service was held at the Presbyterian church after a short service at the home on Tuesday afternoon, at which his pastor, Rev. Lees, used as a tet "The Christian Soldier". Rev. Morgan also gaven an appropriate talk. Beautiful and appropriate music was furnished by a ladies' quartet. Active pallbearers were six grandchildren of the deceased: DA Noble Jr of Sioux City; L. Swartz of Jeffers; Robert and John Lewis of St. Paul; and Robert and Stuart Brown of Windom. Honorary pallbearers were: HE Hanson, Ed MacCaulley, TA Perkins, JC Hakes, PG Redding, OJ Nelson, AF Strunk and Joe Kane.
    The services at Lake View cemetery were in charge of the comrades of the American Legion with a firing squad. R E Skellie as bugler, and color bearers from the National Guards.
    Relatives from out of the city here for the funeral were Dr. and Mrs Richmond, Mrs. and Mrs. L Schwert and three of their children of Jeffers, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Lewis, Daughters Dorothy and Mary and sons John and Robert Lewis of St. Paul, Mr. and Mrs. SA Brown of Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Edwards and daughter Mary and Mr. and Mrs. DA Noble and son David all of Sioux City Iowa. Mrs. Moser and daughter, Mrs. martin of Ames, Iowa and Mrs. William Leighton of Sioux Rapids.7
  • Burial*: He was buried on 31 December 1935 at Windom, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG.16,17
    David A Nobel gravestone, Lakeview Cemetery
  • Note: Yes, I think I can answer the questions that you asked about Grandpa Noble. He was quite a colorful character. I can tell you a great deal about him not only from what my father told me, but also from the research that I have done myself...But back to Grandpa Noble. Yes, his middle name was Andrew, but there is an interesting story to go with it. My father, Grandpa Noble's only son, was named Alexander. You know that my father had five sisters. Your grandmother was the oldest and my father was the youngest child and only boy. Anyway, when he was to be christened, he was to have been named after his father and been D.A. Noble II. But the minister that did the baptism was hard of hearing and by mistake named my father David Alexander Noble.

    Now my grandmother was a one of the old school, strict, down the line Scottish Presbyterians, and she said that Alexander was the name he was baptized with and there would be no chaning of names after the baptism had taken place, and that was final despite everyone else's objection and wish to correct the mistake. It didn't hurt either I don't think she had a brother and father named Alexander. Incidentally, my brother is David Alexander Noble II.

    ...I wrote to the National Archives and got copies of both his military record and pension records. The pension records have by far the best information. I wish my father and his sisters were alive today so that I could tell them all they and grandpa had it all wrong. He was born in Merrickville not Marysville as they all said! He had just forgotten! I spent a lot of time researching this, hunting in the Marysville area, and when I found the Merrickville census it really gave me a lift. This is all confirmed in his pension records. The census report of 1851-2 really is a good one. I(sic) lists even the goods they had in the house.

    ...Mary Ann Noble is one that really has intrigued me. After her husband died, she and grandpa Noble had a very hard life. As was the custom, she lived with numerous family (sic) and did sewing and house work for them. Grandpa Noble was farmed out to work for his room and board and worked for a lot of mean and hard people. ... on 3 October 1994.2

Family: Mary Ann Cuthbert b. 19 Feb 1857, d. 15 Apr 1931

Citations

  1. [S904] Unknown compiler, "Family Tree", Ancestral File, Family search id: LZWQ-VFZ.
  2. [S479] Letter, Alden Noble to Patricia Quade, 31 Oct 1994.
  3. [S18] John A. Brown, History of Cottonwood and Watonwan Counties, p. 86.
  4. [S480] Unknown author, Memorable people in Cottonwood County.
  5. [S18] John A. Brown, History of Cottonwood and Watonwan Counties.
  6. [S594] Caroline Lassen, "Cuthbert Resources."
  7. [S189] Unknown short newspaper title, After 29 Dec. 1935.
  8. [S328] Accessed 13 Sep 2009 online listing, unknown repository address.
  9. [S328] Accessed 13 Sep 2009 online listing, unknown repository address, p.21, line 4.
  10. [S155] Unknown agency, Centennial history of Cottonwood County.
  11. [S181] Madeline, "Infor on Mary Noble," e-mail to Susan Hansen, 3 Nov 2008.
  12. [S840] Marriage Record: unknown manuscript info, unknown repository.
  13. [S18] John A. Brown, History of Cottonwood and Watonwan Counties, p. 200.
  14. [S481] David A Noble, unknown record type, unknown file number.
  15. [S673] Jessie Noble, Poem for 50th.
  16. [S188] David Andrew Noble, Certificate of Death.
  17. [S474] See memorial number unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address, http://www.findagrave.com, Memorial# 57558720.

Mary Ann Cuthbert

F, b. 19 February 1857, d. 15 April 1931

MaryAnn Cuthbert. Note on photo says taken in Scotland.
Quilt top stitched by Mary Ann Richmond 1865, found in trunk held by Patricia Quade
Back: Jessie, Myrtie, Iva. Front: Bertha, Grandma Noble, Joe (David Alexander) Grandpa Noble, Geneva
  • Fact 2*: Mary Ann Cuthbert was Fact 2; Later moved to Buena Vista IA.
  • Occupation*: A housewife at home.1
  • Birth*: She was born on 19 February 1857 at Forfar, Angus, Scotland.1
  • Immigration*: She immigrated in 1871...came to America wither parents when she was fourteen..."2
  • Fact 1*: She was Fact 1 in 1871; Parents came from Scotland in 1871 to Lacrosse WI.
  • Marriage*: She married David Andrew Noble on 12 March 1879 at Burns Valley, LaCrosse County, WI, USA; 1879 he married Mary Cuthbert, a native of scotland. They were
    married at the home of her parents in Burns Valley.3,4
    David Noble and MaryAnn Cuthbert wedding, 1879
  • Marriage Fact*: Written by Jessie Nobel for their 50th Anniversary celebration.

    On a lonely stretch of prairie
    Stood a shanty made of sod,
    Looking eastward, looking westward,
    O'er the trails the buffalo trod.

    In the spring of seventy-nine
    Ona sunndy day in March
    When the snow had long since melted,
    Blue beneath the azure arch.

    In a wagon drawn by horses
    came the sturdy pioneer
    To bettle with the elements
    And homestead his claim that year.

    Came David, dark of hair and beard
    Returning from his sojourns
    With his bride, the gentle Mary,
    From the valley known as Burns.

    Far from books and daily papers
    Still unknown the rural route
    Happy as this generation,
    Happier I have no doubt.

    So they plowed, dragged and seeded
    Hoping for a bountious crop
    But allin vain man's efforts
    Only toil was left on top.

    Three years the same thing happened
    Little reason to rejoice.
    Folks called them fools for staying
    they had no other choice.

    Days of terrific blizzards
    With mercuty at 40 below
    When they burned hay in the cook stove
    And sugar and flour ran low.

    Crusts form on top of the snow,
    too thin for the weight of a horse.
    They had to have needed supplies,
    Some sugar and tea, of course.

    So taking his little land sled,
    throwing on an old gunny sack
    My father walked 16 miles
    to the town of Windom and back.

    He planted a fin grove of trees
    to break the force of the storm
    This served as a beautiful landmard
    to guide travelers forlorn.

    To the south were splendid neighbors
    Ebenezer and Ida Rice
    And likewise to the eastward
    M N Cadwell and his wife.

    there were Vet and Amy Collins,
    Bordy and Ida allan Rice
    On the west still live the Tabberts
    Decendents of a German race.

    then there were the Sillimans,
    Will and Rene, Oney and Jen
    Fred and Roy, some of the former are now Ford Garage men.

    Feeling a lack of consolation,
    they decided to build a church
    Some paid cash, while others worked.
    It still stands "Old Amo Church"

    Still a longing for the flowers
    Mother found scarce on the prairie line
    She named her first three children Myrtle, Ive an Jassamine.

    Next Geneva, later Bertha
    Lastly little David Joe
    Not one of us are missing
    All respond with a glad "hello".

    From far and near we're gathered,
    Jeffers, Sioux City and St Paul
    To celebrate your golden wedding
    The happiest day of all.

    May the cold blasts of winter
    the aches and pains of mortal strife
    Pass o'er you, oh so lightly
    In your sunset days of life.
    in 1929.5
  • CauseDeath: Noted as enteritis (inflammation of the small intestine). Contribuatory Liver abcess and perforation of bowels. No history of injury, 3 days.1
  • Death*: Mary Ann Cuthbert died on 15 April 1931 at Windom, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG, at age 74.1
  • ObituaryText: Mrs. D.A. Noble who has been ill for some weeks, but not considered seriously ill until the last few days died about eight o'clock on Wednesday morning. Her five children had all been home with her over the weekend but Tuesday she seemed so much better that the only son who lives at Sioux City, and the youngest daughter (Bertha) Mrs. Gilbert Edwards returned to their homes. Mrs. Noble was one of the pioneers of this county, one of the women of sterling character who have helped to form the better element of every community. A devoted Christian, member of the Presbyterian church, loving wife an dmother, neighbor and friend shil will be missed by all who knew her. Funeral services will be at two-thirty this afternoon in the Presbyterian Church. We will have a complete obituary next week.6
  • Burial*: She was buried on 17 April 1931 at Windom, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG.1,7
    Mary Ann Noble gravestone, Lakeview Cemetery
  • ObituaryText: Was one of early homesteaders in Amo township. Mrs. D.A. Noble, one of the pioneers of this county and wife of one of our few remaining Civil War veterans, died at her home on Eleventh street about nine o'clock Wednesday morning of last week. Mrs. Noble had been ill for some time and had been in serious condition recently. Her children were home to spend the week end with her but as she seemed to be feeling better they return to their homes. It was only two years ago that this newspaper published the happy account of Mr. and Mrs. Noble's golden wedding anniverary. Mrs. Noble was a splendid Christian woman with hosts of friends who loved her for her beautiful character and kindly manner. The Citizen sympathizes with the family in the frief they experience in the passing of the wife and mother. Obituary: Mary Ann Cuthbert Noble was born February 19, 1857 in Carseburn Scotland. She came to America with her parents, Mr and Mrs Alexander Cuthbert in 1871 when she was fourteen years old, and located in LaCrosse County, Wisconsin. She was married to David A. Noble March 12, 1879. Two years ago the had a very happy celebration of the fiftieth wedding anniversary. At that time a large number of relatives and friends gathered in to do honor to them in celebration of this happy time. In March 20, 1879, the young couple moved to Cottonwood county, Amo township, where they took up a homestaed and also a tree claim. At that time fifty two years ago there were few settler and the difficulties of travel and trade were very great. There were but eight other neighbors in a radius of many miles. During those years the church at Amo was built and Mrs. Noble became one of the Sunday School teachers and assited with her gentle personality in the care and maintenance of that church. Mr. and Mrs. Noble lived eighteen years in Amo. In October 1897 they moved to Windom where they have lived since. Mrs. Noble joined the Presbyterian church in Neshoneo, Wis. and has been faithfully identified with this church ever since. She was recently chosed to be the president of the Ladies Aid Society and was ever a loyal Christan worker in the Missionary society, the Sunday school and the Women's relief Corps. She will be greatly missed within the circles of the church. She died April 15, 1931, surrounded by her family at the age of 74 years, one month and 26 days. She is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Leighton of Sioux Rapids; and Mrs. Mosher of Ames, Iowa. By six children, Mrs. C.D. Richmond of Jeffers, Mrs. Thomas Lewis of St. Paul; Miss Jessie Noble, Windom, Mrs. Allen Brown, Windom, Mrs. Gilbert Edwards of Sioux City; and D.A. Noble Jr of Sioux City. Also by her husband, D.A. Noble. Mrs. Noble was a woman of fine Christian Character; she loved the Lord, she loved the church and the fellowship of Christian people. She was conscientious in her home and churchly duties. One of her last acts of sympathy and kindness was in writing a letter of sympathy in the death of Mrs. Tilford. She loved to share with others every good thing, and her neighborly qualities will be held in fondest remembrance. Her home was the Mecca for her family and friends, the gathering place where all were welcome and where all found sympathy within her loving heart. "Favor is deceitful and beauty is wain, but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be praised." Funeral services were conducted in the Presbyterian church by Rev. W. J. Lowrie, her pastor, and Rev. G. L. Morgan. Both ministers spoke of her life and character of faith and good works. The ninety-first Psalm as read as her favorite Psalm. The serv ies were largely attended by relatives and friends, some were the old setller friends of many years standing. The ball bearers were H.W. Anthony, D.R. Savage, Merton Dyer, J.H. Kane, O.J. Nelson, and A.A. Riedesel. The members of the choir were: Mrs. Carrell, Mrs. Lowrie, Bernard Olson and R.E. Skellie. the hymn "The Home of the Soul" was sung and Mrs. Carrell sang "My Ain Countrie" as a solo, Mrs. W.L. Johnson was the accompanist. The following poem was composed by Rev. Mr. Lowrie and was read by him at the services:
    Gently we lay the dead beneath the sod
    Whose lives are hid with Christ in God,
    Yet the grave it cannot hold them there,
    Faith Looks on to habitation fair
    Where workmen skilled in the Saviour's will
    Have prepared a place for those who love
    And set their hearts on things above.

    Weep not for me the Master said
    Nor number me among the dead,
    Today in Paradise the redeemed shall be
    Whom death in mercy hath set free,
    They see Thy face and know Thy grace
    That led them in their pilgrom way
    Trhough clouds and stress to perfect day.

    We mourn the living who are dead indeed,
    Who have never felt the spirit plead
    Within their souls to open wide the door;
    And let Him dwell within for evermore;
    They live who died in Christ-the Sanctified, They live and wait for us above
    In that sweet home where happiness is and love.2

Family: David Andrew Noble b. 17 Dec 1844, d. 29 Dec 1935

Citations

  1. [S186] Noble Mary Ann, Certificate of Death.
  2. [S274] Cottonwood County Citizen, 22 Apr 1931, p.1.
  3. [S480] Unknown author, Memorable people in Cottonwood County.
  4. [S840] Marriage Record: unknown manuscript info, unknown repository.
  5. [S673] Jessie Noble, Poem for 50th.
  6. [S275] Windom Reporter, 15 Apr 1931, p. 1.
  7. [S474] See memorial number unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address, http://www.findagrave.com, Memorial# 57558723.

Ludwig Erdmann Pankonin

M, b. 31 October 1851, d. 23 May 1929

Front row, left to right: Martha, Father Ludwig, Fred, Selma, Mother Bertha and Hannah. Back row: Bertha, Gustave, Helen, Charles, Amelia, Emil and Louise. Courtesy of Arlene Orloske.
  • Birth*: Ludwig Erdmann Pankonin was born on 31 October 1851 at New Grunen Kreis, Germany.1
  • Marriage*: He married Bertha Mathilde Howe on 17 November 1874 at Germany.
  • Note: Came from Germany in 1876 and settled in Dodge Center. Purchased portion of Sec. 29 form the railroad in 1902 (andy Fruehling farm). Was a "do-it yourself" man. Blacksmith shop on his farm provided a place where he spent a lot of time sharpening plow lays and shoeing horses for the neighbors. He was also a horse doctor, making his own medicine. Turpentine was the main ingredient. Nevertheless, he saved many horses in the area. in 1876.2
  • Immigration*: Ludwig Erdmann Pankonin immigrated in 1876.3,4
  • Note*: FROM: HANDWRITTEN NOTE BY MABLE PANKONIN
    Ludwig married Bertha Howe in Germany. Came to Dodge Center in 1880. Cottonwood
    County in 1889. Born: New Gruenau, Kries, Flatow Germany Oct. 31, 1851.
    MOTHER: Caroline Augusta Rutar(Reiter?) MN and FATHER: Franz William Pankonin
    (Finland).
    Grandpa(Ludwig) and Aunt Lizzie Nickel were born in Germany (Pomeroun). He just
    said he came from the north into Germany therefore Finnish.



    FROM: Photocopy from David Pankonin (12/25/97)
    Ludwig Pankonin and his family came to America from Germany in 1876. They first settled at Dodge Center for a few years before coming to Cottonwood County. in 1902 he purchased a quarter section of land from the railroad. Besides farming, Ludwig had a farm blacksmith shop, spending much of his time sharpening plow lays and shoeing horses. There were eleven children in this family. Gustave, Charlie, Emil, Fred, Louise married August Nickel, Bertha married Charles Schwanke, Selma married William Vollmer, Hannah married Isaac Foth, Amelia married William Pooch, Helen married Fred Kirch, Martha married Ed Missling.

    FROM: Typed note signed by Marvin Pankonin
    Blacksmith shop in Germantown
    Ludwig Pankonin came from Germany in 1876 and settled in Dodge Center. Ludwig purchased a portion of Section 29 from the Railroad in 1902.
    Ludwig was a do-it-yourself man, a blacksmith shop on his farm provided a place where he spent a lot of time sharpening plow lathes, shoeing horses, etc. He was also a horse doctor ---made his own medicine. Turpentine was the main ingredient, nevertheless he saved many horses in this area.
    Ludwig and his wife were deeply religious. When the preacher could not be at a service, Ludwig would take over. His education may not have been so good, but it was great in the Bible.
    They retired to Jeffers where Ludwig went into orchard work, grafting apple trees. He also raised tobacco for his own use. Do not know what the brand was, but there has never been any with such aroma before or after. in 1876.
  • Census: He and Bertha Mathilde Howe appeared on the census of 1895 at Germantown Twn, Cottonwood County, MN, USA; spelled Louy, birth about 1852, white.5
  • Census*: Ludwig Erdmann Pankonin and Bertha Mathilde Howe appeared on the census of 6 June 1900 at Germantown Twn, Cottonwood County, MN, USA.6
  • Occupation*: Blacksmith, retired farmer in May 1929.1
  • CauseDeath: Noted as dropsy, which he had been a sufferer for several years. Cause of death-Chronic Bright's disease (about 3 years) and old age.7,1
  • Death*: Ludwig Erdmann Pankonin died on 23 May 1929 at Rosehill Township, Lamberton, Redwood County, MN, USAG, at age 77.1
  • Burial*: He was buried on 26 May 1929 at Germantown Twp, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG.1,8
    Ludwig Pankonin gravestone, Red Rock Cemetery.
  • ObituaryText: L.E. Pankonin, former prominent farmer of the Germantown community died at his home in Jeffers last Thursday. May 23rd. Arrived at the age of 77 years. Death due to dropsy, which he had been a sufferer for several years. Funeral at Red
    Rock Evangelical Church. Burial in the Red Rock church cemetery.Ludwig Edman Pankonin was born Oct. 31 1851 in New Grunen Cries Germany. He grew to manhood there and was united in marriage to Bertha Howe, Nov. 17 1874 in Germany. This
    union was blessed with 11 children (4 sons) one daughter preceded the father in death. In 1880 they came to America and settled in Dodge Center MN where they resided for ten years before coming to Germantown township. In 1911 they retired from farm life and moved to Jeffers. Mr. Pankonin was a kind husband and
    father, a good neighbor and highly respected by all who knew him. He united with the Evangelical church at Dodge center and thereafter was faithful member, attending services regularly and supporting the church in a material way. He leaves to mourn his wife, Charles, Emil, Fred, Gust, Mrs. Charles Schwanke, Mrd. Ed Missling, Mrs. William Pooch, Mrs. August Nickel and Mrs. I. Foth all of Germantown township. and Mrs. Farmer who resides in Minneapolis. There are 57 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren.7

Family: Bertha Mathilde Howe b. 11 Nov 1851, d. 19 Jan 1938

Citations

  1. [S288] Ludwig Pankonin, Certificate of death.
  2. [S155] Unknown agency, Centennial history of Cottonwood County, p. 174.
  3. [S424] Gary and Arthur L. Finnell Richter, Sanborn Centennial History, p. 170. from Germany, settled in Dodge Center for a few years.
  4. [S469] Gustaf Pankonin household, 1900 U.S.Federal Census, Cottonwood County, Minnesota, listed year of immigration as 1880, lived in US for 20 years, naturalized.
  5. [S467] 1895 Digital image, Cottonwood County, MN, Roll V290_54, birth abt 1847, white.
  6. [S469] Gustaf Pankonin household, 1900 U.S.Federal Census, Cottonwood County, Minnesota.
  7. [S154] Sanborn newspaper, 30 May 1929.
  8. [S474] See memorial number unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address, http://www.findagrave.com, Memorial# 57447207.

Bertha Mathilde Howe

F, b. 11 November 1851, d. 19 January 1938
  • Birth*: Bertha Mathilde Howe was born on 11 November 1851 at Germany.1
  • Marriage*: She married Ludwig Erdmann Pankonin on 17 November 1874 at Germany.
  • Immigration*: Bertha Mathilde Howe immigrated in 1880 to Dodge Center, Dodge County, MN, USAG; In the spring of 1880, Mr and Mrs Pankonin, with several of their children crossed the Atlantic and came to Dodge Center, Minn.2
  • Immigration: She and Gustav Adolph Pankonin immigrated in April 1880 to Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA, USA; Came to the U S in 1880. Listed on the manifest for the American Line "Lord Gough" April, 1880 landing in Philadelphia. Also Bertha Pankonen, age 28, August Howe, age 15, Louise Pankonin (age 2.)3,4
    Lord Gough ship
  • Census: Bertha Mathilde Howe and Ludwig Erdmann Pankonin appeared on the census of 1895 at Germantown Twn, Cottonwood County, MN, USA; spelled Louy, birth about 1852, white.5
  • Census*: Bertha Mathilde Howe and Ludwig Erdmann Pankonin appeared on the census of 6 June 1900 at Germantown Twn, Cottonwood County, MN, USA.6
  • Occupation*: Housewife in 1938.1
  • Death*: Bertha Mathilde Howe died on 19 January 1938 at Springfield, Brown County, MN, USAG, at age 86.1
  • CauseDeath: Noted as Cardiac asthma 1 year, contribuatory cause influenza bronchitis 1 week.1
  • ObituaryText: Bertha Mathilda Howe Pankonin was born in Germany on November 11, 1851, and died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. August Nickel in springfield Minn. on Jan 19, 1938 at the advanced age of 86 years, two months and eight days. Mrs. Pankonin received her training in German schools and grew to womanhood there. On Nov. 17, 1874 she was married to Ludwig Pankonin, which union was blessed with eleven children of whom one daughter preceded her in death. In the spring of 1880, Mr and Mrs Pankonin, with several of their children crossed the Atlantic and came to Dodge Center, Minn. where they farmed for ten years, and then heeded the call to come still farther west and in the year 1890 moved, with their family, to Cottonwood County where they farmed until 1911 and then retired at Jeffers. Here the father died in 1929. About five years ago Mother Pankonin gave up housekeeping and has since been dividing her time among her children. Soon after their arrival in America both Father and Mother Pankonin were converted and joined the Evangelical church at Dodge Center and later transferred their membership to our Red Rock Evangelical church where they were faithful until their Lord called them home. she leaves to mourn her passing four sons and six daughters, namely: Gustav Pankonin, Sanborn; Mrs. August Nickel, Springfield; Charley Pankonin, Sanborn; Mrs. Charley Schwanke, Sanborn: Mrs. Fred Kierce, Minneapolis; Emil Pankonin, Sanborn; Mrs. Wm. Pooch; Mrs. Ed Missling, Jeffers; Mrs. Isaac Footh; Fred Pankonin, Windom, besides 60 grandchildren and 34 great grandchildren. Funeral Services were conducted Saturday, Jan. 22 at 2 pm at the August Nickel home in Springfield and at 2:15 at the Red rock church with burial at the church cemetery. Rev. H. F Rieke was in charge.2
  • ObituaryText: Mrs. Bertha Pankonin died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. August Nickel, on Wednesday, January 19, after a lingering illness and complications due to old age. Mrs. Pankonin had been spending her winters at the Nickel home and at other times has been at the homes of her other children. She had been sick four years. The deceased, whose maiden name was Howe, was born in Germany on Nov. 11, 1851. She grew to womanhood and was married to Ludwig Erdman Pankonin a blacksmith in Germany in 1874. In 1880 the family immigrated to America and settled at Dodge Center, but came later to Cottonwood county where they farmed until about 10 years ago, when Mr. Pankonin died. The deceased was the mother of eleven children. One daughter, Mrs. William vollmer, passed away some time ago. The surviving children are: Gustav, Charles, Emil, Mrs. Edward Missling, and mrs. Charles Schwanke of Cottonwood County; Mrs. Fred Kierce of Minneapolis; Mrs William Pooch of Lamberton; and Fred Pankonin and Mrs Isaac Foth of Windom. She also leaves 60 grandchildren and 34 great-grandchildren. Services were held at the Red Rock Evangelical church on Saturday afternoon with Rev. H. F Rieke officiating.7
  • Burial*: She was buried on 22 January 1938 at Germantown Twp, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG.8,1
    Bertha Pankonin gravestone, Red Rock Cemetery.
  • Note*: FROM: Handwritten note by Mabel Pankonin
    Bertha Howe Pankonin born Germany, 11/Nov/1851.Married in Germany and came to Dodge Center in 1880. Mother was Augusta Pethrnick Howe, Father William Howe (England). The Howes owned a string of bakeries in England, Holland and Germany. in 1965.

Family: Ludwig Erdmann Pankonin b. 31 Oct 1851, d. 23 May 1929

Citations

  1. [S563] Bertha Pankonin, Certificate of Death.
  2. [S58] Cottonwood County Citizen, 26 Jan 1838.
  3. [S224] Gustaf (age 4) Pankonin, Lord Gough Digital image, Apr 1880, p. 16.
  4. [S469] Gustaf Pankonin household, 1900 U.S.Federal Census, Cottonwood County, Minnesota, Came to US in 1880, lived here for 20 years and naturalized.
  5. [S467] 1895 Digital image, Cottonwood County, MN, Roll V290_54, birth abt 1847, white.
  6. [S469] Gustaf Pankonin household, 1900 U.S.Federal Census, Cottonwood County, Minnesota.
  7. [S50] Springfield Advance, 27 Jan 1938, p. 10.
  8. [S474] See memorial number unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address, http://www.findagrave.com, Memorial# 57447193.

Wilhelm Carl Nickel

M, b. 21 August 1840, d. 7 October 1923

Wilhelm Nickel, 1916
Wilhelm Nickel family.Wilhelm seated on the left, Wilhelmina seated on the right. Back row: August, Will, Amelia, Emma, Minnie. Center - Lena and young boy in front is Fred. About 1900.
  • Note: August W. Nickel, a progressive farmer of Germantown township Cottonwood county, and owner of a fine farm of four hundred acres which he has developed in excellent shape, is a native of Germany, but has lived in Minnesota since he was six years old. He was born on May 18, 1873, son of Wilhelm and Emma (Luck) Nickel, natives of that country, who came to Minnesota in 1879 and settled on a homestead tract of eighty acres in Germantown township, Cottonwood county. Wilhelm Nickel started his farming operations in the new country with one ox and one cow, but quickly began to prosper and he gradually added to his tract until he was the owner of a fine farm of three hundred and twenty acres. There he made his home until 1904, when he and his wife moved to Lamberton, where they lived until 1910, in which year they moved to Jeffers, where they are now living. Wilhelm Nickel is a Republican and he and his wife are members of the Evangelical chuch in the faith of which their children were reared. There were seven of these children, of whom August W. was the second in order of birth, the others being Minnie, Emma, W.C., Amelia, Lena and Fred.1
  • Name Variation: Wilhelm Carl Nickel was also known as William.2
  • Birth*: He was born on 21 August 1840 at kleine Silber, Kreis Arnswalde, Pommern, Germany.3
  • MilitaryService*: Served as a German soldier between 1866 and 1879.3
  • Marriage*: He married Wilhemenia Frederika Emma Luck on 11 November 1866.4
    Wilhelm and Wilhelmina on their 50th anniversary about 3 Nov 1916
  • Occupation: Listed as workman on 16 April 1879.5
  • Immigration*: Wilhelm Carl Nickel immigrated on 16 April 1879; From Hamburg, Germany to New York on the ship SS Herder. Wilhelm, Frederike, Auguste, Wilhelm and Bertha Nickel listed as between deck passengers. Albert Luck, Carl, Friederike, and Emma Thram also aboard.5
    Herder ship Wilhelm immigrated on
  • Note*: Registered in the USA Dec 28 1882 according to a Nickel surname board, 2000. on 28 December 1882.
  • Residence*: He lived in 1885; lived in a sod hut and received a homestead patent for land in Section 34.3
  • Naturalization*: He was naturalized on 7 July 1885 at Windom, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG; He filed declaration of intent in Brown County, June 17, 1879. Renounced Emperor of Germany.6
  • Note: Original text in german. Golden Wedding. The 3rd of November, 1916, Brother and sister-in-law Wilhelm Nickel celebrated their golden wedding jubilee in their home in Jeffers, MN. Both were born in Kreis Arnswald, Germany. The father is now 76 years old and his spouse 70. Father Nickel in his time was a german soldier and he made 3 field marchs. One in Denmark in 1865 and one in Austria in 1866 and one in France in 1870. In the year 1879 this lucky couple left for America. Eight children were born to them. Seven are still living, and they all live nearby. They lived near Jeffers many years on the farm. Through saving and much work they with their children had a good home. They have been living several years in town and enjoying their retirement. From there they thought to celebrate. Four little grandchildren recited a poem together. They sang songs with organ and violin music. After many good wiches and giving of gifts they all fathered around the table which was laden with food. A thank offering for the Lord's work was laid on the altar by the jubilee couple. May the lord give them more days and years with their children. May they rest with the people of God above. after 3 November 1916.7
  • Occupation*: Listed as a farmer on his death certificate. in 1923.8
  • Death*: He died on 7 October 1923 at Germantown twn, Cottonwood County, MN, USA, at age 83.8
  • CauseDeath: Noted as Thromboangiitis obliterans ( is a disease that causes obstruction of the blood vessels of the hands and feet) Spondylosis Deformans ('welding of the vertebrae)
    for 4 years 9 months. contributory ? gangrene left foot 1 month.8
  • Burial*: He was buried on 11 October 1923 at Germantown Twp, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG.9,10,11
    Wilhelm Nickel gravestone, Red Rock Cemetery

Family: Wilhemenia Frederika Emma Luck b. 3 Feb 1846, d. 29 Jan 1927

Citations

  1. [S18] John A. Brown, History of Cottonwood and Watonwan Counties.
  2. [S218] Amelia Pankonin, Certificate of Death.
  3. [S424] Gary and Arthur L. Finnell Richter, Sanborn Centennial History, p. 169.
  4. [S404] Jeffers Review, 10 Feb 1927, p.1.
  5. [S327] SS Herder, online http://www.immigrantships.net/1800/herder790416.html
  6. [S303] MN State Historical Society microfilm, Reel 3, Vol. B, code 8, p. 21 (accessed 3 Mar, 2009), St Paul, Ramsey County, MN, USA.
  7. [S22] Unknown short newspaper title.
  8. [S55] Nickel Wilhelm, Certificate of death.
  9. [S423] Typed manuscript.
  10. [S545] Windom Reporter, 23 Jan 1959, unknown.
  11. [S474] See memorial number unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address, http://www.findagrave.com, Memorial# 57447185.

Wilhemenia Frederika Emma Luck1

F, b. 3 February 1846, d. 29 January 1927

Wilhelmina Nickel, 1916
  • Occupation*: Housewife.2
  • Note*: Been in US 47 at time of death.2
  • Birth*: Wilhemenia Frederika Emma Luck was born on 3 February 1846 at Kreis Arnswalde, Pommern, Germany.
  • Marriage*: She married Wilhelm Carl Nickel on 11 November 1866.3
    Wilhelm and Wilhelmina on their 50th anniversary about 3 Nov 1916
  • Immigration*: Wilhemenia Frederika Emma Luck immigrated on 16 April 1879; From Hamburg, Germany to New York on the ship SS Herder. Carl, Friederike and Emma Thram are listed as well as the Wilhelm Nickel's.4
  • CauseDeath: Noted as Pulmonary hemorrhage - 3 days.2
  • Death*: She died on 29 January 1927 at Cottonwood County, MN, USA, at age 80.5,2
  • Burial*: She was buried after 29 January 1927 at Germantown Twp, Cottonwood County, MN, USAG.6
    Wilhelmina Nickel gravestone, Red Rock Cemetery
  • ObituaryText: Grandma Nickel passed away peacefully to the Great Beyond on Saturday, January 29th, at 12:30 P.M. at the old homestead where she made her home with her son, W.A. Nickel. At the time of her death, she was eighty years, eleven months and twenty-five days of age. Wilhelmina Luck was born in Germany in 1846. On November 11, 1866, she was united in marriage to Wilhelm Nickel. To this union nine children were born, six of whom survive her. They are: August, Will, Fred and Mrs. G.A. Pankonin, of Germantown township, Mrs. Henry Karow, of Amboy and Mrs. L.H. Block of Santa Ana, California. Mr. & Mrs. Nickel came to America in 1879 on settled on a homestead in Germantown Township Cottonwood County. Here they reared their family of children, suffering all the hardships of pioneer days. After many years of labor they were rewarded by having their children grow up and settle on farms and homes of their own in the immediate vicinity. In 1906 they deceded to retire from active farm life and moved to Lamberton where they resided for six years. Then they moved to a home in Jeffers where they lived for six years. As they became more feeble the children decided to care for them and they moved back to the old homestead and made their home with her son Will. Mr. Nickel passed away three years ago. Funeral services were held from the Red Rock Evangelical church, of which she had been an active member and worker for years. Rev. Adelman conducted the services, and the Germantown choir sang several of her favorite songs. Besides her children she leaves 37 grandchildren, 25 great great grandchildren and other relatives and a host of friends to mourn her loss. Here on earth no more she'll roam, Our Heavnely Father has called her Home. There with Angel voice she will sings Glory to our Lord and King. Precious Mother she has left us Left us yes, forever more. But we hope to meet our loved one on that bright and happy shore. Card of thanks. We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to our friends and neightbors for the kindness shown during the illness and death of our beloved mother, Mrs. Wilhelm Nickel. The Children.3

Family: Wilhelm Carl Nickel b. 21 Aug 1840, d. 7 Oct 1923

Citations

  1. [S545] Windom Reporter, 23 Jan 1959, unknown.
  2. [S54] Nickel Wilhelmina, Certificate of death.
  3. [S404] Jeffers Review, 10 Feb 1927, p.1.
  4. [S327] SS Herder, online http://www.immigrantships.net/1800/herder790416.html
  5. [S22] Unknown short newspaper title.
  6. [S474] See memorial number unknown record type, unknown repository, unknown repository address, http://www.findagrave.com, Memorial# 57447186.

John Gode

M, b. 21 June 1847, d. 3 May 1922

John Gode family. (back) Edward, Albert, Helena. Seated: John, Amelia, William. (standing front) Clara, Dora.
John Gode Family. (back) Dorothy, Albert, Clara, William, Helena. (front) Edward, John, Lawrence, Fred, Amelia. Taken about 1904
  • Occupation*: Farmer.1
  • Note*: FROM: Handwritten note from Mable Pankonin: Johann Goede.
  • Name Variation: John Gode was also known as Johann Goede.
  • Birth*: He was born on 21 June 1847 at New Shoewald, Germany.2
  • Immigration*: He immigrated in 1868 to Brandon, Fond du Lac County, WI, USA; possibly on Ship Weser from Bremen to NYC.3
  • Marriage*: He married Amelia Louise Griese on 21 November 1872 at Alto, Fond du Lac County, WI, USA; By what ceremony contracted: Ev. Association.
    Groom's Father: Wm Goede, mother: Karoline. Bride's father: August, mother: Louise.2
  • Residence: John Gode lived in 1904 at Lamberton, Redwood County, MN, USA; Moved to Lamberton.
  • Medical*: Known medical issues:; BET JAN 1916 AND MAY 1922 Dr. cared from him & he had surgery about 1918/.
  • CauseDeath: Noted as carcinoma of intestines, 3 yrs, operation in 1918.1
  • Death*: He died on 3 May 1922 at Lamberton, Redwood County, MN, USAG, at age 74.1
  • ObituaryText: John (Goede) Gode was born in New Shoewald Germany in 1847 - 1922 a prussian. He came to America with his family in 1868 - making their home in Brandon, Wisconsin. He had one brother, William, later of Emerald Wisconsin; three sisters, Mrs. August Werner of Buffalo, Minnesota; Mrs. Thomas Jones of Montrose, Minnesota; and Mrs. William Ramptum of Montrose, Minnesota.
    Emelia Griese, born July 14, 1854 - 1936 in Germany. She came to this country with her parents, the August Griese's and family in 1867. They lived on a farm near Brandon, Wisconsin. She married John Gode, November 21, 1872. The couple lived in Wisconsin until 1880 when they moved to the Sanborn vicinity and took a homestead. Later, they moved to Lamberton, Minnesota (1904).
    The family consisted of five sons: William of Lamberton, Edward and Albert of Sanford, Fred of St. Paul; Lawrence of Mankato; and three daughters: Dorothea (Mrs. F E Juhnke), Waseca Minnesota; Helen, (Mrs. Edward Gluth) of Sleepy Eye, Minnesota and Clara (mrs. Herman Wegner) of Clear Lake, South Dakota. John Gode died may 3, 1922 in Lamberton, Minnesota. Funeral services were held from the German Evangelical Church and was attended by one of the largest crowds ever present at such an occasion, showing the deep respect the deceased was held by all who knew him. Rev. Melzian and the Rev. F P Werner, both of Sleepy Eye, Minnesota had charge of the services-- the former preaching in German and the latter in English. A special solo was rendered by Lloyd Juhnke. Interment was made in the cemetery east of Lamberton, Minnesota. after 3 May 1922 at Lamberton, Redwood County, MN, USAG.3
  • Burial*: He was buried after 3 May 1922 at Lamberton, Redwood County, MN, USAG.3
  • Residence*: He lived in 2000 at Cottonwood County, MN, USA; Know as the Gode farm since 1881, the 245 acres in Germantown township, 3 1/2 miles southwest of Sanborn, were recognized as a Century Farm at the 2000 Cottonwood County Fair. "Our family farm is actually 199 years old, but we just got around to having it officially named a Century farm, " said Ellsworth Gode, third generation owner of the farmstead. It all started with his grandfather, John Gode, who was born in New Shoewald, Germany in 1847. He first settled in Brandon, Wes. and lived there from 1872 to 1880. John and Amelia were married in 1872. They were the first people to live on the Cottonwood County property. They bought the bare land for $360. The purchase was made possible as part of the Grant of Lands to aid in construction of railroads. It was enacted in 1857. St. Paul and Sioux City Rail Road Co. owned many acres through 1876 until the Winona and St. Peter Railroad Co. filed a suit a won. "When my ancesteros came here, they made a whole in the hill and built a sod house," Ellsworth said. "The well was below, and in the winter they had to shoevel down the hill to get to it." Later, John built a house on top of the hill. He also built a barn, granary, hen house, corncrib and machine shed. The Godes had eight children: William, Edward, Dorothea, Albert, Helena, Clara, Frederick and Lawrence. On June 1, 1920 John and Amelia sold the farm to their son, Albert. The sale price was $11,600. John died in 1922, four years after Ellsworth was born. "After Grandpa Gode died, Grandma lived with us until her death in the 1930's," Ellsworth remembered. "I think Grandpa wasn't very tall, but he had big, broad shoulders. Grandma used to put me on her knee and tell stories about the family."...4

Family: Amelia Louise Griese b. 14 Jul 1854, d. 16 Dec 1936

Citations

  1. [S53] Gode John, Certificate of death.
  2. [S824] Marriage registration.
  3. [S259] Dick Elliott, "Email about John Gode," e-mail to Susan Hansen, 18 Mar 2001.
  4. [S169] Cottonwood County Citizen, 20 Dec. 2008, p.13.
  5. [S424] Gary and Arthur L. Finnell Richter, Sanborn Centennial History, p. 198.

Amelia Louise Griese

F, b. 14 July 1854, d. 16 December 1936

Amelia Griese Gode
  • Name Variation: Amelia Louise Griese was also known as Emelia.
  • Birth*: She was born on 14 July 1854 at Neuscheualbe, Germany.1
  • Immigration*: She immigrated in 1867 to Brandon, Fond du Lac County, WI, USA; Came with her parents in 1867 and settled near Brandon, WI.2
  • Marriage*: She married John Gode on 21 November 1872 at Alto, Fond du Lac County, WI, USA; By what ceremony contracted: Ev. Association.
    Groom's Father: Wm Goede, mother: Karoline. Bride's father: August, mother: Louise.3
  • CauseDeath: Noted as Cause of death acute myocarditis contributed by generalized arterioclusions.1
  • Death*: Amelia Louise Griese died on 16 December 1936 at Cottonwood County, MN, USA, at age 82.1
  • Burial*: She was buried on 19 December 1936 at Lamberton, Redwood County, MN, USAG.4
  • ObituaryText: Grandma Gode passed away Wed. morning between 3 and 4 at the Albert Gode home. Grandma Gode's funeral was Saturday afternoon at the Evangelical Church. She was laid to rest in the Lamberton Cemetery. She was 82 years, 5 months, and a few days of age.

    Mrs. John Gode Dies Wednesday

    Services Conducted at Germantown Church Saturday came to This Community in 1880

    Death claimed one of the community’s most beloved mothers in the death of Mrs. John Gode, last Wednesday morning. Grandma Gode, as she was tenderly called by so many, has been feeble for a number of years, but always maintained a loving disposition, and always maintained that interest in her family and friends.
    Following a sick spell three weeks previous to her death, she grew weaker daily. Early Tuesday morning she lapsed into a coma, and peacefully passed way at four o’clock on Wednesday morning.
    Emelia Gode, nee Griese, was born July 14, 1854, in Germany, and died December 16, 1936, at the home of her son, Albert, near Sanborn.
    She came to America with her parents in 1867 and settled near Brandon, Wisconsin. The same year she was converted and joined the Evangelical church. She was united in marriage to John Gode, November 21, 1872. This union was blessed with ten children, two of whom died in infancy.
    In 1880 she moved with the family to the vicinity of Lamberton. In 1904 they moved into the city of Lamberton where her husband preceded her in death in 1932. For the last six years she has made her home with her son, Albert on the old homestead, it was here she suffered her last illness and finally answered the call of her Lord to be with Him. She had reached the age of 82 years, 5 months, and 2 days.
    Her constant concern was for the temporal and spiritual welfare of her family, and truly it can be said, “she being dead yet speaketh.” Her Godly counsel and prayers will linger with us who remain to guide our lives to the ultimate place of reunion. She sleeps in Christ.
    She leaves to mourn her loss, five sons, William of Lamberton, Edward and Albert, near Sanborn, Fred of St. Paul, and Lawrence of Mankato. Three daughters, Mrs. F.E. Juhnke of Waseca, Mrs. E.A. Gluth of Portland, Oregon, and Mrs. H.W. Wegner of Milbank, S.D. There are also thirty-three grand-children, twenty great-grandchildren, and a host of friends and neighbors and relatives.
    Services were held at the Germantown Evangelical church Saturday afternoon at 1:30. A host of friends and relatives assembled and the beautiful floral pieces bespoke the high esteem and regard held for Mrs. Gode.
    The pallbearers were: Milton Juhnke, Melvin Gode, Rollance Gode, Lloyd Gode, Eugene Gode, and Armin Wegner.
    Rev. G.G. Davis officiated and interment was made in the Lamberton City Cemetery. The quartette that sang at the house was Harvey and Clarence Griese, Wilbert Juhnke and Rolland Juhnke. The quartette at the church was composed of Harvey Griese, Miss Leona Gerth, Mildred Stocker and Rolland Juhnke.4,5

Family: John Gode b. 21 Jun 1847, d. 3 May 1922

Citations

  1. [S52] Gode Amelia, Death Certificate.
  2. [S259] Dick Elliott, "Email about John Gode," e-mail to Susan Hansen, 18 Mar 2001.
  3. [S824] Marriage registration.
  4. [S978] Lamberton News, 26 Dec 1936.
  5. [S177] Cottonwood County Citizen, 23 Dec. 1936, 10.
  6. [S424] Gary and Arthur L. Finnell Richter, Sanborn Centennial History, p. 198.